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Rethinking the Deliniation between HRBPs and OD Practitioners

It is time we re-think the delineation between Human Resource Business Partners and OD practitioners, finding ways to leverage the strengths of each to advance our common purpose: improving the way organizations operate.

“Endurance athletes need to manage their energy over extended time periods and long distances. They do this by using both passive and ‘active recovery’ to replenish energy. In endurance training, active recovery is time during practice when you train at a slower pace.” Author Alison Eyring suggests that, at work, active recovery “helps you and your team catch your professional breath so that you go the distance to grow your business.”

“Financial capital is abundant but carefully managed; human capital is scarce but not carefully managed. Why? In part, it’s because we value and reward good management of financial capital. And we measure it. Great CEOs are held in high regard for their clever management and allocation of financial capital. But today’s great CEOs need to be equally great at managing human capital.” Harvard Business Review’s Eric Garton asks, “How can we manage human capital better?”

“There is a personal element to both culture and purpose,” writes Dan Pontefract. “One cannot rely solely on the organization to enact an engaged culture or a purpose-driven ethos. It really does start with you.”

“Many of us feel at times as if we are impersonating a leader rather than working out what it means to be ourselves in a position of leadership,” writes Jesse Sostrin in Strategy+Business. “Instead of covering up those underdeveloped areas, great leaders learn how to operate as they truly are.”